Laura Veirs Interview, Press Round up

Laura_Veirs_5-Photo_by_Alicia_J_Rose-400x600.jpg

Laura’s first Tumble Bee related interview went up today at Zooglobble.com

Zooglobble: What are your earliest musical memories?
Laura Veirs: I definitely remember Dad singing me to sleep. He plays very casually — the piano, guitar, charango. By very casual, I mean almost “half-correct.” It was nice not to have that pressure.

I actually don’t know how to read music, which, now that I’m a parent puts me in a bit of a dilemma. For me it’d be nice to play piano with my son and have him play along, but I’d prefer him to have the joy…

Read it here.

Meanwhile, other press has been rolling in and we are delighted.

“The goodwill is unmistakable.” – NPR

“It’ll leave you—and any kids you know—with a beaming grin through simple yet elegant arrangements and spirited production that taps into everyone’s purity, innocence and youthful exuberance.” – American Songwriter

“Thematically, Veirs draws on all the light and shade, sadness and shadows of traditional nursery rhymes and fairy tales. And so we find vigilantes and mountain shacks, bales of cotton, bivouacs and Kingston town, as well as a whole fluttering, fidgeting menagerie – foxes, birds, elephants, frogs and mice, cows and geese. It’s a subject matter that seems to suit Veirs’ tone; her voice perhaps never sounded so sad and lovely as it does when carried along on the clip-clop of some hushed lullaby: “When you wake you will have cake / And all the pretty little horses.”” -BBC

“That this is an album for children shouldn’t deter grown-up fans of Veirs, who will find her customary blend of wisdom and whimsy all present and correct.” (****) – Uncut

“Following the birth of her first child, the underappreciated Laura Veirs recorded an album of mostly traditional folk songs for children, which has charm beyond the nursery: ‘Little Lap Dog Lullaby; and ‘All The Pretty Little Horses’ are as beautiful as anything from Sufjan Steven’s ‘Seven Swans’ and the record whips by on a breeze…” – NME